Performance psychology, Sports Psychology

Mastery at the Masters

The even, consistent, and record-setting performance of Dustin Johnson over four days at the 2020 Masters is a tribute to the many little things he has done over a very long time. His first “Green Jacket” is proof that for the biggest goals we have in life, we can put in the effort, but the outcome has many moving parts beyond our control. In other words, despite the meticulous crafting and visioning of dreams and goals we don’t get to pick exactly “when” it happens.

In the fading light of the singular Autumn finish, Johnson described his childhood dream of winning the Masters, having grown up a short ride away in South Carolina. This brings to the light the second aspect of the dream turned major goal: While trying to describe the feeling of his accomplishment, Johnson paused several times to gather himself. He remarked that he didn’t know why he was having such a hard time remaining composed. He even compared his ability to remain even on the course in the heat of the world’s best competition to the moment which seemed, on the surface, just an interview.

The flood of emotions is in proportion to meaning. And meaning is proportional to the tireless pursuit, the victories and adversity, the effort given consistently and intently over time. This is the process, and it ensues for years before the outcome is realized. And when this goal is reached it becomes an inflection point in lives and careers, a timestamp of purposeful living. You feel alive.

I offer this in a time when many are struggling to find meaning, and live as if life is meaningless. And for this assumption, the individual feels less than alive. Take away the golf, the exquisite backdrop of Augusta National, and you have a father trying to find his way. I don’t know Dustin Johnson, but I find it interesting that 30 of his 49 top three finishes, 15 of his 24 wins, and his two major victories have come after becoming a father.

You can argue “an athlete’s prime” or “putting it all together” or “realizing potential” but history is filled with the same narrative—right up to that inflection point that changes a career from good to great. Then the stories are far fewer—the ones like Johnson’s.

As a father and for fathers, I can say that a growing family makes life more complex. But on a deeper level you find you have more and can give more. And the more you give, the more you can give. And it’s easier to let go, tune in, and tune out what doesn’t seem to matter anymore. Not when you look at your children, into the eyes full of life and potential you are now responsible for.

Perhaps it is there, in this gaze you find your own potential staring back at you.

Not sure if this is true for Dustin Johnson. Hard to say. And hard to find the words for something so transforming. Perhaps that’s how he felt when he struggled to do something as simple as speak about four rounds of golf. Maybe the hallowed grounds of Augusta framed the sacred space of a father and a professional overcome by meaning.  Maybe… 

If you would like more structure to take your mental approach to the next level, consider picking up a copy of my new sports psychology workbook: Above the Field of Play. Or to learn about other sports psychology services pricing (including an assessment of your present mental approach), visit my website at DrJohnPanepinto.com.

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photo credits: Marc Clinton Labiano (unsplash.com)

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