Coaching, leadership, Performance psychology, Sports Psychology

Reflective Coaching Practices V

The final reflective coaching practice examines space and time from a birds-eye view. We truly step back and search for patterns in the structure and quality of our coaching. Patterns that either move us forward toward short- and long-term goals—or create plateaus and stagnation. It is difficult to see these patterns from within. Making time to observe from a distance of time and space provides the practical point of view to see these patterns in action.

Reflect on Patterns. Was I aware of coaching patterns today? As we improve in areas, we become unconsciously competent in terms of skills and habits. This saves time and energy and allows for fresh experiences. The problem arises when we are working solely from these patterns that flow just below conscious awareness. Becoming aware of our teaching, language, and relational patterns helps to discover points of change and leverage. We can become aware of the autopilot mode and step back for a fresh perspective. Newness and novelty stimulate growth. So does fun! Going through the motions of a stale lesson plan may look outwardly active but is a passive approach to growth and can lead to the opposite of desired results.

Putting it all together, there are three very powerful reasons for incorporating these reflective practices. First, data and video offer externals—the content and products of performance, but reflective practices get deep into the process and context of the experience. First-serve percentage may be an important metric, but, in hindsight, you find that not all the serves were the same. Moments differ in intensity. The qualities of interoception, self-awareness, effort, and motivation are not evident in cumulative statistics. These important elements are captured in the reflective practice and are pivotal to next level performance.

Secondly, imagination, creativity, and vision require a different mental space than the immediacy of teaching, coaching, or practicing. Performance and deliberate practice require presence and attention to execution in the moment. The vision of a future and more highly evolved self flows from a deeper and more reflective space. One that includes past, present, and future selves. The blueprint may start from a blank page but provides the receptive space to the imagination and creativity we intuitively know as potential. Without engaging in this actualizing process, we simply get more of the same and are left to rationalize and wonder about the metrics generated from these “same” experiences.     

Finally, reflective practices respect the dynamic processes of challenge and support, of the developmental path of differentiation to integration. We learn, practice then incorporate. We challenge then repair. We push ourselves then rest. We challenge ideas and habits of thinking, then reflect.

The rhythm of this process is unique to the individual and is the lifeblood of development. Again, a product-focused culture is not fond of the reflective space required for this process. But without it, days and practices have a similar, mechanical tone. In these familiar routines we may know where we are and what we are doing—the ultimate in control— yet without employing these reflective practices where we are heading lacks the required vision and leadership. 

If you would like more structure to take your mental approach to the next level, consider picking up a copy of my sports psychology workbook: Above the Field of Play. Or to learn about other sports psychology services (including an assessment of your present mental approach), visit my website at DrJohnPanepinto.com.

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photo credits: Unsplash.com

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