Performance psychology, Sports Psychology

Distraction or…?

The human body is an open system. Our “roots” are only symbolic and movement is a primary principle one of our systems. If we sit in one space (without the help of others) we will never make it as we have to move to survive. And our bodies and minds follow the “use it or lose it” principle.

In an open system, we are able to use, learn, develop, and enhance our internal environment with aspects from the external environment—including other individuals. On some level the inner-outer boundary is arbitrary, but one thing is for sure: being open brings both opportunities for growth, but also positions of vulnerability.

The need for self-awareness is key, for this quality is the true gatekeeper. All experience effects, some more than others. But to know what sustains versus what drains is the essence of the gatekeeper.

There are two ways to assess moving towards a vision and actualizing what one believes to be potential. One is by what is happening and the other by what is not happening. Interestingly, both can be sources of vulnerability, both can infiltrate and decrease the quality of an open system.

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First, what is happening can become mindless and routine. Worst, it can become too comfortable. We like to do what we like to do. But, discomfort and frustration are an inevitable part of the pathway to development and confidence—and resilience.

Second, what is not happening can be so far under the radar that it only reaches self-awareness when the course/progress/outcomes have radically shifted. In this area, distractions can be a major detractor to development. Distractions can feel good in the moment and are not inherently bad. Most distractions are fairly neutral, and this is a reason why we may not notice until something is not happening.

If you are wondering about your own distractions, ask yourself these questions:

Tools: Am I using tools to plan, track and monitor? Am I using these tools regularly to reflect on what is important and what I really want to give my time to? If not, what is in the way?

Technology: Am I becoming too immersed in my technology/social media? A few minutes here and there can gain momentum and become something much larger in terms of time investment. While technology is not going away, it has to have its place in the overall scheme. Most time on technology is a quick burst for the reward centers. These can become major distractions.

Time: At the end of the day/practice/competition did I give my time (invest) in what I say truly matters? If so, then this builds motivation, confidence, and momentum. If not, look at the who or what or how of time spent. What do you notice?

 

If you would like more structure to take your mental approach to the next level, consider picking up a copy of my new sports psychology workbook: Above the Field of Play. Or to learn about other sports psychology services pricing (including an assessment of your present mental approach), visit my website at DrJohnPanepinto.com.

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Performance psychology, Sports Psychology

Worked–Needs Work

If you have your goals for the year written and envisioned for where you want to be, who you want in your circle, and what you want to accomplish, then it becomes easier to find the point of greatest leverage: Right now.

What can you do right now to align with and move towards your vision?

The answer to this is simply: the process of improvement. I use the word, simply, because it is important to keep it simple. So:

  • Keep your goals with you
  • Look at them regularly—daily or more if you need to
  • Decide what to do today
  • Make the connection between the plan and the process
  • During practice reps, focus on the process—the how of what you are working on

 

At the end of the day, it is extremely important to enlist the power of reflection. Taking the time to consider what you have given your time to reinforces that the process has been meaningful. You are sending important messages to the meaning centers of the brain when you take the time to reflect on what matters. This strengthens connections (mind and muscle memory) and stokes motivation.

Following practice or competitions, a simple method of accountability, as well as an important way to keep track of trends, is the following:

  • Make two columns in your journal or in your progress notebook
  • Label one column: Worked
  • Label the second Column: Needs Work
  • Reflect back on your goals

 

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What works (+)? What needs to change (Delta)?

You will find that you will begin to look at the parts of practice (or competition) differently and be able to integrate these aspects into the bigger picture. Under Worked, consider what improved, what felt in synch, solid, and repeatable. Under Needs Work, track what did not meet expectations, felt less than steady, or what you need to continue to give attention to. From this simple system, you can stay aligned and on target, and plan your next practice session.

If you would like more structure to take your mental approach to the next level, consider picking up a copy of my new sports psychology workbook: Above the Field of Play. Or to learn about other sports psychology services, visit my website at DrJohnPanepinto.com.

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Delta Image Created by Rawpixel.com – Freepik.com

Performance psychology, Self-help, Sports Psychology

One Thing

Each year, more and more information reveals the workings of our mind, the brain, and all of its centers. And generally speaking, the brain mirrors who we are: generalists with specialists supporting what matters most. In other words, there are only a few major sources of motivation and we require different skills and abilities to make this happen. These capacities can be developed, but only with specific intentions.

First, having a plan reduces anxiety as it creates an internal sense of control. Further, having written goals and a system of accountability promotes achievement. What both of these ideas have in common is focusing valuable resources in a particular direction. In other words, in the sea of possibilities, our entire being works more efficiently when there is a clear sense of purpose.

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The greatest strategy for achievement is to focus intently on one thing. Research points to the fact that we cannot multi-task. Interestingly, those who think they are good at multi-tasking actually performed worse than those who did not think they were good at it.

So much for clarity!

While much of our consciousness is on auto-pilot, this state of being frees up energy and focus for what we truly want to attend to. But, often in practice or in competitions we do what we always have done and miss the opportunity of deliberate practice and progress.

So, as 2019 begins, make it a point to ride the power of a clear plan. Before practice, very simply decide what you are going to improve. Write it down. A journal is great for this process as well as for accountability. Eliminate distractions—try to make the practice place a space dedicated to your process, meaning you are there for one reason, one thing only. Ask, how will I know I improved? At the end of practice, revisit the goals and assess. What you will notice is as you make this a habit, your practices:

  • Look different, have more variety, and don’t feel exactly the same
  • You improve in the short-term incrementally
  • Momentum builds and skills (mental and physical) begin to transform
  • Your choices reflect these changes and reinforce them

One thing that is a very important effect of this method, is that we are no longer hampered, held-back or disillusioned by labels and rationalizations. There is much more of an open-ended, process-oriented feel to this method that makes static observations less likely (“I had a bad day.”). You don’t have to blame, shame, make excuses or give in because every day is an opportunity to take a step forward.

Happy New Year and all the best in 2019!

If you would like more structure to take your mental approach to the next level, consider picking up a copy of my new sports psychology workbook: Above the Field of Play. Or to learn about other sports psychology services, visit my website at DrJohnPanepinto.com.

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Performance psychology, Sports Psychology

Seasons

In every sport or endeavor, there are natural ups and downs in terms of training and competing. The holiday season and the year-end are natural breaks in a 12-month plan and a perfect time for reflection. One of the great tasks of any individual or team is to make enough space to truly see where and who we have been, and what we have accomplished. With this space, we can truly be objective about our plan, goals, and progress. We can look back with clarity to move forward in a purposeful way.

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Many years ago I sustained a knee injury that changed my life in the moment, as well as the arc of my life. The surgery did not go well and what was to be an 8-week recovery turned into 18 months of “inactivity.” No blame is being cast here, but I discovered years later through a second surgery that the original one was botched. It is easy to feel cheated and perhaps seek restitution. But my faith is such that when you start blaming it never stops and the idea of litigation answered nothing for me.

And, though this occurred decades ago, those 18 months proved to be one of the most valuable “seasons” of my adult life. How could I feel slighted?

During those 18 months I lost: the ability to do what I loved the most, time with people that I trained with and cared about, income, and, most importantly, time.

You can’t ever get these precious things back. But, what I received instead was of incredible value. Why?

When you are completely removed from the world you know, you are in the ultimate unknown, and in the greatest space between who you are, where you have been, and where you are going. In this space of loss, I gained a new wider and deeper perspective on life. It is easy when things are going well to think the future will bring more of the same. And it’s easy to lose the value of the moment, of gratitude, and of purpose.

When I was finally able to play again, it was truly playful. I was better than I had been prior and more successful as well. How could that be?

I never stopped.

During those 18 months I “played” every day, and more importantly, in that space, I saw who I wasn’t, but deeply wanted to be. The mind is powerful and the greatest accomplishments start in the infinite field of consciousness, above the field of play. This field is open to all.

Now I am not proposing that you get injured. The story above also includes chapters on heartache, lost opportunities, other injuries related to the first one, activities that I could not physically do with my sons, and eventually a total knee replacement earlier this year. I would not wish this on anyone.

My wish for you is to make the space during this natural downturn, and in that time reflect deeply. Find the gratitude, discover the play in your activity, capture the imagination of your childhood and create a plan that inspires you.

I wish you well and may 2019 be truly what you wish.

If you would like more structure to take your mental approach to the next level, consider picking up a copy of my new sports psychology workbook: Above the Field of Play. Or to learn about other sports psychology services, visit my website at DrJohnPanepinto.com.

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Performance psychology, Sports Psychology

Reframing

One of the key skills in the mental performance toolbox is the ability to shift perspective. From being completely immersed in the moment to making space for a long-term vision, each perspective informs and can transform.  In the ups and downs of improvement and growing as an athlete and an individual, there will be times when the challenge or obstacle is daunting. It is in these moments when choices can shape the next leg of the journey and alter the future in unexpected ways.

When we meet these moments, the energy and the emotion we experience can reach unmanageable levels. Maybe this moment occurs within an event, or it might be an extended losing streak or during a stretch when nothing seems to be working. Regardless, such moments are inevitable. Self-awareness is vital to creating the space to witness how these moments are processed. Under such stress it is natural to engage in fight or flight types of choices, choices tainted with negativity and pointing away from what we truly want.

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Many careers have turned in such moments—some not for the better. There are a few important ideas to consider when meeting this moment. Understanding the psychological basis to these ideas beforehand can help you to reframe the challenge you are facing, and bring the intention of your journey back into focus.

  1. Mental states matter: Under duress, we have thoughts that align with the state. Typically, these are not thoughts that directly align with our goals, but simply validate that we are experiencing a high level of stress. Resilience and managing these states is important to unlocking potential.
  2. The edge of our capabilities is always uncomfortable. The evolution of any mental or physical structure or capacity brings large helpings of discomfort. The confusion you feel is literally the fusion of two mental schemes that are trying to occupy the same space. One has to go—the one of lower capability.
  3. Opportunity is on the far side of safety. The only security we have is in our intention, commitment, resilience, and belief in ourselves. Like the seedling breaking through rock in unlikely circumstances, each level of success requires a sense of adventure—and courage.
  4. Expect the unexpected. The edge of our awareness shares this boundary with what we are not aware of. Awareness and unawareness exist side by side, but we are gifted with the greatest learning entity in the universe.
  5. Beware of rationalizations. These mental tools are only meant to ease stress. Logic can explain away lack of progress or outcomes, but you end up in the same place. Own the experience completely—success or failure. This opens the door to the next experience. Remember point number 1 for mental states matter, and states can become traits. Rationalized states can lead to traits of “I can’t” and “It doesn’t matter.”
  6. Stages can’t be skipped. You can’t jump from beginner to elite. And most of the time we are in some transition along the growth curve. This means that on some level we are different each day. Just as our body requires movement, challenge, and proper training principles to improve and endure, the same is true of our mental capacity. Breaking through is often a break away from what we know or can presently do. If we are heading someplace we have never been, we can have the best plan but we still don’t know how it feels and who we will be until we get there.

 

If you would like more structure to take your mental approach to the next level, consider picking up a copy of my new sports psychology workbook: Above the Field of Play. Or to learn about other sports psychology services, visit my website at DrJohnPanepinto.com.

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Performance psychology, Sports Psychology

A Focus on Attention

Attention is complex and there is more to the process than the ability to simply “pay attention.” Focused and integrated attention requires the training and discipline that affords the simplicity of process at the point of performance. At any sporting event, you can hear someone on the sidelines (coach, friend, fan or parent) urge a competitor to “Focus!” The truth is the average attention span is less than 8 seconds and we can process only a small percentage of the sensory (internal and external) information presented each moment. So, where we place our focus and attention becomes more and more important and influential to performance.

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Competitive performance requires the self-awareness to focus on the critical elements of execution, and the ability to regulate and shift focus as required. And this is a dynamic process with many factors that test the limits of our abilities. Each event is singular by nature, therefore these abilities must be practiced beforehand.

First, to pay attention requires the clarity of purpose to filter out what doesn’t matter. Basically, three systems have to be in sync to make this happen:

  1. Activation Levels (Energy for the task)
  2. Emotional or Limbic centers (Meaning)
  3. Executive functions managing attention (Focus)

Each of these represents different areas of the brain that must be integrated towards a way of being in the moment, a state that allows one to perform in flow and the Zone of Optimal Performance.

Questions often help us to get to the source of what we can’t sense or feel. Considering the three areas represented above, try these questions to bring each of these centers into awareness.

  1. Do I have a sense of my level of energy (activation or arousal levels) while I am executing? Using a scale from 1 (lowest) to 10 (highest) decide which number or range of numbers represents a good level for performing during a competition or practice. For example, someone standing over a 5-foot putt will have a different activation level (low arousal, alert) than a middle linebacker in football (high arousal, alert).
  2. Do I have a clear sense of meaning and purpose for practice and competition? Do I have goals that represent the vision I have for myself over time of what matters most?
  3. Do I practice focusing and refocusing both in practice and in isolation as a distinct skill set?

These questions clarify the key aspects of attention and focus. Make this important function of the mental game part of your daily routine.

If you would like more structure to take your mental approach to the next level, consider picking up a copy of my new sports psychology workbook: Above the Field of Play. Or to learn about other sports psychology services, visit my website at DrJohnPanepinto.com.

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Photo Credit: Created by Kjpargeter – Freepik.com

Performance psychology, Sports Psychology

The Heart of a Comprehensive Mindset

It would be beneficial to lay out all the aspects of thinking, feeling, and acting that make up the lens through which we perceive and interact with the challenges of competition. But it would be too complex and impractical. It is far better to work with foundational beliefs that make up a competitor’s mindset— principles and values that provide support, motivation, and perspective for the journey. Then we have:

  • The internal sense of simplicity enabling us to meet the moment
  • A way to understand our choices–short and long-term
  • A framework with the integrity to keep us from fooling ourselves.

This latter statement comes from the importance of understanding our choices when things do or do not go our way. It is the only path that leads to the arc of development. For without knowing the source of progress and setbacks, we stunt our growth at the point of understanding.

Today we start with three of the principles of developing a comprehensive mindset: Attitude, improvement, and effort.

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Attitude: Having a positive attitude is important, but it is not the whole picture. Attitude is also a compass. It is the guiding force keeping us in alignment with values and goals. Refining attitude is a lifelong process for we have to know what to give our full attention and energy—and what to say, “no” to. There is much to do and time is precious. Attitude sets the tone and provides a sense of clarity. The proper attitude allows for progress, keeps us in process, allows for adjustment, and is not deterred by setbacks. Deep down attitude reveals beliefs and expectations. When we approach practice or an event with a purposeful and positive attitude, our poise and determination are evident. Attitude is the manifestation of our motivation, intent, and vision.

Improvement: With a bent on continuous improvement, you have the means to make the most of every situation, every event, and every interaction. Each time you play, practice, or reflect you have the resources necessary to grow and develop. Improvement need not be compartmentalized. Working on improving in all aspects of development creates a synergistic effect. We grow in one area and find that it influences another. One of the key factors of long-term growth and success is balance. We can’t neglect certain areas and focus entirely on others. We are not wired that way. Our fundamental motivation is to fulfill needs in key areas in a self-determined manner. Neglect one area and you will experience the misalignment in some way, whether it be a sense of distraction, dissatisfaction, loneliness or feeling unfulfilled. In the comprehensive mindset, growth is global and thought out carefully for body, mind, spirit, and relationships.

Effort: Nothing reveals more to oneself than the honesty of effort. At the source, only you will know the true level of effort given to a task, practice or competition. Once we have a vision of our future selves, the effort we give in the present is the greatest leverage towards development. People in your sphere can offer you information, tools, and resources, but only you can give the effort. And the integrity to give your best in the moment is something only you can measure. Again, the right and consistent effort creates synergy and momentum. In giving your best, you realize you can be your best, and this magnifies and resonates our deepest sense of motivation. Giving our best inspires, as well as softening the blow of outcomes not in our favor. And then we can build and plan on something certain and not a vague sense of what went wrong.

Next time we will take a look at the fundamental beliefs making up a comprehensive mindset.

If you would like more structure to take your mental approach to the next level, consider picking up a copy of my new sports psychology workbook: Above the Field of Play. Or to learn about other sports psychology services, visit my website at DrJohnPanepinto.com.

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