Performance psychology, Sports Psychology

Worked–Needs Work

If you have your goals for the year written and envisioned for where you want to be, who you want in your circle, and what you want to accomplish, then it becomes easier to find the point of greatest leverage: Right now.

What can you do right now to align with and move towards your vision?

The answer to this is simply: the process of improvement. I use the word, simply, because it is important to keep it simple. So:

  • Keep your goals with you
  • Look at them regularly—daily or more if you need to
  • Decide what to do today
  • Make the connection between the plan and the process
  • During practice reps, focus on the process—the how of what you are working on

 

At the end of the day, it is extremely important to enlist the power of reflection. Taking the time to consider what you have given your time to reinforces that the process has been meaningful. You are sending important messages to the meaning centers of the brain when you take the time to reflect on what matters. This strengthens connections (mind and muscle memory) and stokes motivation.

Following practice or competitions, a simple method of accountability, as well as an important way to keep track of trends, is the following:

  • Make two columns in your journal or in your progress notebook
  • Label one column: Worked
  • Label the second Column: Needs Work
  • Reflect back on your goals

 

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What works (+)? What needs to change (Delta)?

You will find that you will begin to look at the parts of practice (or competition) differently and be able to integrate these aspects into the bigger picture. Under Worked, consider what improved, what felt in synch, solid, and repeatable. Under Needs Work, track what did not meet expectations, felt less than steady, or what you need to continue to give attention to. From this simple system, you can stay aligned and on target, and plan your next practice session.

If you would like more structure to take your mental approach to the next level, consider picking up a copy of my new sports psychology workbook: Above the Field of Play. Or to learn about other sports psychology services, visit my website at DrJohnPanepinto.com.

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Performance psychology, Self-help, Sports Psychology

One Thing

Each year, more and more information reveals the workings of our mind, the brain, and all of its centers. And generally speaking, the brain mirrors who we are: generalists with specialists supporting what matters most. In other words, there are only a few major sources of motivation and we require different skills and abilities to make this happen. These capacities can be developed, but only with specific intentions.

First, having a plan reduces anxiety as it creates an internal sense of control. Further, having written goals and a system of accountability promotes achievement. What both of these ideas have in common is focusing valuable resources in a particular direction. In other words, in the sea of possibilities, our entire being works more efficiently when there is a clear sense of purpose.

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The greatest strategy for achievement is to focus intently on one thing. Research points to the fact that we cannot multi-task. Interestingly, those who think they are good at multi-tasking actually performed worse than those who did not think they were good at it.

So much for clarity!

While much of our consciousness is on auto-pilot, this state of being frees up energy and focus for what we truly want to attend to. But, often in practice or in competitions we do what we always have done and miss the opportunity of deliberate practice and progress.

So, as 2019 begins, make it a point to ride the power of a clear plan. Before practice, very simply decide what you are going to improve. Write it down. A journal is great for this process as well as for accountability. Eliminate distractions—try to make the practice place a space dedicated to your process, meaning you are there for one reason, one thing only. Ask, how will I know I improved? At the end of practice, revisit the goals and assess. What you will notice is as you make this a habit, your practices:

  • Look different, have more variety, and don’t feel exactly the same
  • You improve in the short-term incrementally
  • Momentum builds and skills (mental and physical) begin to transform
  • Your choices reflect these changes and reinforce them

One thing that is a very important effect of this method, is that we are no longer hampered, held-back or disillusioned by labels and rationalizations. There is much more of an open-ended, process-oriented feel to this method that makes static observations less likely (“I had a bad day.”). You don’t have to blame, shame, make excuses or give in because every day is an opportunity to take a step forward.

Happy New Year and all the best in 2019!

If you would like more structure to take your mental approach to the next level, consider picking up a copy of my new sports psychology workbook: Above the Field of Play. Or to learn about other sports psychology services, visit my website at DrJohnPanepinto.com.

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Performance psychology, Sports Psychology

Seasons

In every sport or endeavor, there are natural ups and downs in terms of training and competing. The holiday season and the year-end are natural breaks in a 12-month plan and a perfect time for reflection. One of the great tasks of any individual or team is to make enough space to truly see where and who we have been, and what we have accomplished. With this space, we can truly be objective about our plan, goals, and progress. We can look back with clarity to move forward in a purposeful way.

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Many years ago I sustained a knee injury that changed my life in the moment, as well as the arc of my life. The surgery did not go well and what was to be an 8-week recovery turned into 18 months of “inactivity.” No blame is being cast here, but I discovered years later through a second surgery that the original one was botched. It is easy to feel cheated and perhaps seek restitution. But my faith is such that when you start blaming it never stops and the idea of litigation answered nothing for me.

And, though this occurred decades ago, those 18 months proved to be one of the most valuable “seasons” of my adult life. How could I feel slighted?

During those 18 months I lost: the ability to do what I loved the most, time with people that I trained with and cared about, income, and, most importantly, time.

You can’t ever get these precious things back. But, what I received instead was of incredible value. Why?

When you are completely removed from the world you know, you are in the ultimate unknown, and in the greatest space between who you are, where you have been, and where you are going. In this space of loss, I gained a new wider and deeper perspective on life. It is easy when things are going well to think the future will bring more of the same. And it’s easy to lose the value of the moment, of gratitude, and of purpose.

When I was finally able to play again, it was truly playful. I was better than I had been prior and more successful as well. How could that be?

I never stopped.

During those 18 months I “played” every day, and more importantly, in that space, I saw who I wasn’t, but deeply wanted to be. The mind is powerful and the greatest accomplishments start in the infinite field of consciousness, above the field of play. This field is open to all.

Now I am not proposing that you get injured. The story above also includes chapters on heartache, lost opportunities, other injuries related to the first one, activities that I could not physically do with my sons, and eventually a total knee replacement earlier this year. I would not wish this on anyone.

My wish for you is to make the space during this natural downturn, and in that time reflect deeply. Find the gratitude, discover the play in your activity, capture the imagination of your childhood and create a plan that inspires you.

I wish you well and may 2019 be truly what you wish.

If you would like more structure to take your mental approach to the next level, consider picking up a copy of my new sports psychology workbook: Above the Field of Play. Or to learn about other sports psychology services, visit my website at DrJohnPanepinto.com.

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Performance psychology, Sports Psychology

One Way

While mature relationships are a two-way street, the relationship you have with yourself and your sport is fully realized if it points with certainty in one direction. In the modern world of options and backup plans, there are certain sacred spaces that deserve and require our full attention and commitment. Interestingly, research has uncovered associations between too many choices and anxiety. And I have found time and time again that fear lurks at the source of the “backup plan.”

We as human beings seem to have a problem with “What if?” Rather than seeing the openness as the portal to imagination and creativity, many skip the possibilities and go straight to the door that says “I have to know.” But the truth is a plan is just a plan and you don’t know all that life will place along your path.

The point here is one of quality. If I commit fully to what is right in front of me and part of my path, I not only can grow as an athlete, but levels of competence and character are opened in the pure and intentional process that is not available to one who does not take the risk. The principle of risk-reward comes down to how one feels and defines a sense of security. You can’t have the reward of opportunity while you have one foot in Plan B. It doesn’t work that way and never will. No risk, no reward— and you can’t have the gaping chasm of opportunity and the security of what is known only in the present. By definition, opportunity is a direction, but the outcome is unknowable in the present.

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This concept is eloquently spoken by an all-time great in November/December 2018 issue of Tennis magazine. Rafa Nadal referencing an intensely battled five-set win reflects: “I lost in Wimbledon in a match like this. Today was for me. In some way when you give everything you have, win or lose—is just that someone have to lose, someone have to win, that’s part of the game. But the personal satisfaction when you give everything and you play with the right attitude is the same.”

In other words, on some level playing with all you have and with the right attitude is winning. Not everything that matters can be measured for its form exists in an internal quality—“ a personal satisfaction” that resonates from the integrity to a purpose, the commitment to the “Only Plan.” For there is no Plan B.

If you would like more structure to take your mental approach to the next level, consider picking up a copy of my new sports psychology workbook: Above the Field of Play. Or to learn about other sports psychology services, visit my website at DrJohnPanepinto.com.

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Performance psychology, Sports Psychology

Developing a Mindset for All Seasons

In the previous post, we talked about the foundation of a Comprehensive Mindset: Effort (What we give), Attitude (Where we are heading and Why), and Improvement (How we get there). In this post, we delve into the principles of developing a comprehensive mindset. These are the beliefs that underlie the intelligence fueling motivation toward growth and driving peak performance. These beliefs are a crucial aspect of our psychological structure, but they are also demanding and indicators of where you are on the path. In other words, do you find these beliefs to be self-reinforcing and motivating? If so, you are more likely to continue and gain both enjoyment and a sense of purpose from an activity that others find too difficult.

In my mind, the previous statement is the biggest point of separation between levels of play: what individuals and teams at one level find to be too consuming and challenging, others on a different level will find in the investment of time a sense of freedom and fulfillment.  If the latter is the case, you are in the space of flow and intrinsic motivation.

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Let’s take a brief look at each belief:

  • Motivated by the process of consistently executing at the highest level: The athlete has a vision of oneself performing at high levels; has been inspired by someone who has been a model of excellence for them.
  • Is growth-oriented (versus talent is fixed): Believes that talent is only a starting point, and that directed effort along with consistency over time are the keys to development.
  • Is driven by learning, experiencing, and reflecting: Believes that each day provides ample opportunities to develop in all areas of self (mind, body, spirit, and relationships).
  • Is self-aware and continually seeks to learn more about self: Believes in the importance of questioning assumptions and expanding the limits of one’s current level of perception.
  • Seeks consistent improvement: Sets short and long-term goals, and measures backward in time answering the question: Am I better in any way than I was a week ago?
  • Allows the body’s intelligence (unconscious competence) to respond in the moment: While consciously competent of why things work, the athlete allows the process of being present at the point of execution.
  • Understands adversity is part of competition and can manage it effectively: Has structures in place that allow for the inevitable challenges and unknowns that keep one in the mental space for optimal performance.
  • Focuses on what can be controlled in the moment: Understands the intersection of reality and expectations; does not resist what the situation presents; understands the point of greatest psychological leverage.

 

These 8 points can be experienced concretely in any aspect of the athlete’s journey. Whether it is planning, practice, play or post-experience reflection, these beliefs are a part of the overall equation. The more you bring these beliefs into the open, the more you will sense how they factor into your developmental arc. Practice and competition bring diverse experiences and many possible outcomes because of factors beyond your control. These 8 beliefs account for effectiveness and efficiency along that continuum of experience because they underlie execution at the point of performance.

Finally, the goal of the comprehensive mindset is excellence, not just in competition but in every facet of living. Note that excellence is a quality of being and doing (and is not perfection), and a commitment to the process of improvement. This creates an alignment in all your roles and activities that enable the highest level of integrity and synergy as an individual. While performance is benchmarked at each level of each sport, often the mindset of each level is not so transparent. These 8 points help to bring out in the open the drivers of the process. Improving and excelling require a mindset of growth and resilience, and must receive the same intensity of focus and attention as the development of physical skills. Make a plan today…

If you would like more structure to take your mental approach to the next level, consider picking up a copy of my new sports psychology workbook: Above the Field of Play. Or to learn about other sports psychology services, visit my website at DrJohnPanepinto.com.

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Performance psychology, Sports Psychology

The Heart of a Comprehensive Mindset

It would be beneficial to lay out all the aspects of thinking, feeling, and acting that make up the lens through which we perceive and interact with the challenges of competition. But it would be too complex and impractical. It is far better to work with foundational beliefs that make up a competitor’s mindset— principles and values that provide support, motivation, and perspective for the journey. Then we have:

  • The internal sense of simplicity enabling us to meet the moment
  • A way to understand our choices–short and long-term
  • A framework with the integrity to keep us from fooling ourselves.

This latter statement comes from the importance of understanding our choices when things do or do not go our way. It is the only path that leads to the arc of development. For without knowing the source of progress and setbacks, we stunt our growth at the point of understanding.

Today we start with three of the principles of developing a comprehensive mindset: Attitude, improvement, and effort.

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Attitude: Having a positive attitude is important, but it is not the whole picture. Attitude is also a compass. It is the guiding force keeping us in alignment with values and goals. Refining attitude is a lifelong process for we have to know what to give our full attention and energy—and what to say, “no” to. There is much to do and time is precious. Attitude sets the tone and provides a sense of clarity. The proper attitude allows for progress, keeps us in process, allows for adjustment, and is not deterred by setbacks. Deep down attitude reveals beliefs and expectations. When we approach practice or an event with a purposeful and positive attitude, our poise and determination are evident. Attitude is the manifestation of our motivation, intent, and vision.

Improvement: With a bent on continuous improvement, you have the means to make the most of every situation, every event, and every interaction. Each time you play, practice, or reflect you have the resources necessary to grow and develop. Improvement need not be compartmentalized. Working on improving in all aspects of development creates a synergistic effect. We grow in one area and find that it influences another. One of the key factors of long-term growth and success is balance. We can’t neglect certain areas and focus entirely on others. We are not wired that way. Our fundamental motivation is to fulfill needs in key areas in a self-determined manner. Neglect one area and you will experience the misalignment in some way, whether it be a sense of distraction, dissatisfaction, loneliness or feeling unfulfilled. In the comprehensive mindset, growth is global and thought out carefully for body, mind, spirit, and relationships.

Effort: Nothing reveals more to oneself than the honesty of effort. At the source, only you will know the true level of effort given to a task, practice or competition. Once we have a vision of our future selves, the effort we give in the present is the greatest leverage towards development. People in your sphere can offer you information, tools, and resources, but only you can give the effort. And the integrity to give your best in the moment is something only you can measure. Again, the right and consistent effort creates synergy and momentum. In giving your best, you realize you can be your best, and this magnifies and resonates our deepest sense of motivation. Giving our best inspires, as well as softening the blow of outcomes not in our favor. And then we can build and plan on something certain and not a vague sense of what went wrong.

Next time we will take a look at the fundamental beliefs making up a comprehensive mindset.

If you would like more structure to take your mental approach to the next level, consider picking up a copy of my new sports psychology workbook: Above the Field of Play. Or to learn about other sports psychology services, visit my website at DrJohnPanepinto.com.

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