Performance psychology, Self-help, Sports Psychology

One Thing

Each year, more and more information reveals the workings of our mind, the brain, and all of its centers. And generally speaking, the brain mirrors who we are: generalists with specialists supporting what matters most. In other words, there are only a few major sources of motivation and we require different skills and abilities to make this happen. These capacities can be developed, but only with specific intentions.

First, having a plan reduces anxiety as it creates an internal sense of control. Further, having written goals and a system of accountability promotes achievement. What both of these ideas have in common is focusing valuable resources in a particular direction. In other words, in the sea of possibilities, our entire being works more efficiently when there is a clear sense of purpose.

black ball point pen on white notebook
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The greatest strategy for achievement is to focus intently on one thing. Research points to the fact that we cannot multi-task. Interestingly, those who think they are good at multi-tasking actually performed worse than those who did not think they were good at it.

So much for clarity!

While much of our consciousness is on auto-pilot, this state of being frees up energy and focus for what we truly want to attend to. But, often in practice or in competitions we do what we always have done and miss the opportunity of deliberate practice and progress.

So, as 2019 begins, make it a point to ride the power of a clear plan. Before practice, very simply decide what you are going to improve. Write it down. A journal is great for this process as well as for accountability. Eliminate distractions—try to make the practice place a space dedicated to your process, meaning you are there for one reason, one thing only. Ask, how will I know I improved? At the end of practice, revisit the goals and assess. What you will notice is as you make this a habit, your practices:

  • Look different, have more variety, and don’t feel exactly the same
  • You improve in the short-term incrementally
  • Momentum builds and skills (mental and physical) begin to transform
  • Your choices reflect these changes and reinforce them

One thing that is a very important effect of this method, is that we are no longer hampered, held-back or disillusioned by labels and rationalizations. There is much more of an open-ended, process-oriented feel to this method that makes static observations less likely (“I had a bad day.”). You don’t have to blame, shame, make excuses or give in because every day is an opportunity to take a step forward.

Happy New Year and all the best in 2019!

If you would like more structure to take your mental approach to the next level, consider picking up a copy of my new sports psychology workbook: Above the Field of Play. Or to learn about other sports psychology services, visit my website at DrJohnPanepinto.com.

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Performance psychology, Sports Psychology

Seasons

In every sport or endeavor, there are natural ups and downs in terms of training and competing. The holiday season and the year-end are natural breaks in a 12-month plan and a perfect time for reflection. One of the great tasks of any individual or team is to make enough space to truly see where and who we have been, and what we have accomplished. With this space, we can truly be objective about our plan, goals, and progress. We can look back with clarity to move forward in a purposeful way.

autumn avenue bench fall
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Many years ago I sustained a knee injury that changed my life in the moment, as well as the arc of my life. The surgery did not go well and what was to be an 8-week recovery turned into 18 months of “inactivity.” No blame is being cast here, but I discovered years later through a second surgery that the original one was botched. It is easy to feel cheated and perhaps seek restitution. But my faith is such that when you start blaming it never stops and the idea of litigation answered nothing for me.

And, though this occurred decades ago, those 18 months proved to be one of the most valuable “seasons” of my adult life. How could I feel slighted?

During those 18 months I lost: the ability to do what I loved the most, time with people that I trained with and cared about, income, and, most importantly, time.

You can’t ever get these precious things back. But, what I received instead was of incredible value. Why?

When you are completely removed from the world you know, you are in the ultimate unknown, and in the greatest space between who you are, where you have been, and where you are going. In this space of loss, I gained a new wider and deeper perspective on life. It is easy when things are going well to think the future will bring more of the same. And it’s easy to lose the value of the moment, of gratitude, and of purpose.

When I was finally able to play again, it was truly playful. I was better than I had been prior and more successful as well. How could that be?

I never stopped.

During those 18 months I “played” every day, and more importantly, in that space, I saw who I wasn’t, but deeply wanted to be. The mind is powerful and the greatest accomplishments start in the infinite field of consciousness, above the field of play. This field is open to all.

Now I am not proposing that you get injured. The story above also includes chapters on heartache, lost opportunities, other injuries related to the first one, activities that I could not physically do with my sons, and eventually a total knee replacement earlier this year. I would not wish this on anyone.

My wish for you is to make the space during this natural downturn, and in that time reflect deeply. Find the gratitude, discover the play in your activity, capture the imagination of your childhood and create a plan that inspires you.

I wish you well and may 2019 be truly what you wish.

If you would like more structure to take your mental approach to the next level, consider picking up a copy of my new sports psychology workbook: Above the Field of Play. Or to learn about other sports psychology services, visit my website at DrJohnPanepinto.com.

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